Jimmy Webb, Punk Rock Stylist to the Stars, Dies at 62

Debbie Harry, Billie Joe Armstrong and Duff McKagan paid tribute to store manager of legendary Trash and Vaudeville

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – JUNE 05: Mae McKagan and Jimmy Webb during the Mae McKagan Capsule Collection Launch at I NEED MORE on June 05, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Gonzalo Marroquin/Getty Images for Mae McKagan Fall/Winter 2019 Capsule Collection

Jimmy Webb, punk rock stylist and iconic manager and buyer for famed New York clothing store Trash and Vaudeville and boutique store I NEED MORE, died Tuesday morning at 62 after a long battle with cancer. Webb’s friend Tina “Heart” Montalbano confirmed his death to Rolling Stone.

As a stylist and shop owner, Webb’s clients included rock royalty like Iggy Pop, Guns N’ Roses’ Duff McKagan, Joan Jett and Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein. Following his death, numerous musicians paid tribute to Webb on social media.

“This is a heartbreaker. Jimmy, you are a treasure of New York. Always a positive energy. You always lived out loud,” wrote Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong on Instagram.  McKagan added, “The sweetest man and pure punk f*cking rock n roll. Jimmy has SUCH a story, and my family and I feel honored and loved to be a small part of his triumphant tale. We love you Jimmy…we will miss you, brother.”

“We are all going to miss our wonderful friend Jimmy Webb,” Debbie Harry, who the business owner often credited as his muse, told The New York Post. “There goes a lovely unique NYC character. I feel lucky to have known him.”

Webb started working at Trash and Vaudeville in 1999 and soon rose to become the store’s top employee, as well as a manager and buyer. He styled rock stars and fashion-minded scenesters alike, with the store’s abundant collection of leather jackets, T-shirts, Doc Martens shoes and more.

Webb’s eye for edgy fashion earned him a strong reputation and work as a stylist to punk rockers and pop stars, including outfitting everyone from the Ramones to Beyoncé and Justin Bieber. The looks he had fashioned have been featured in Rolling Stone, Vogue and MTV.

Growing up in Wynantskill, New York, Webb moved to Connecticut for a short stint in community college after high school. In an interview with The New Yorker, Webb said when he moved to New York, he and got a job “delivering cocktails in a gay bar, and I could see where that would lead, and I wanted more. I wanted to dance and live, so I took off into the streets by myself with all the other runaway boys. No fear.”

Webb said he struggled with drug addiction and homelessness prior to his career in punk fashion.

The self-described “runaway boy” loved dancing and frequented clubs like Studio 54. Webb would spend hours putting his outfits together before hitting the clubs. In an interview with Vogue, Webb said that he’d always wanted to work at Trash and Vaudeville, and in  1999, after finally getting clean, he was hired to work there.

In his time at the legendary shop, his audacious style earned him the honorary title of  the “reigning Mayor of St. Marks Place” and “punk rock’s unofficial shopkeeper.” In 2017, he opened his own boutique, called I NEED MORE, where he worked until his death.

Up until Monday, Webb was active on his Instagram page, sharing videos of friends and family, including a number of photos from the February event at his store with the aforementioned artists and more.

This is a heart breaker . Jimmy you are a treasure of New York. Always a positive energy. You Always lived out loud. Rest In Peace. #ineedmore @ixneedxmore

A post shared byBillie Joe Armstrong (@billiejoearmstrong) on

My pal…the sweetest man and pure punk f*cking rock n roll. Jimmy has SUCH a story, and my family and I feel honored and loved to be a small part of his triumphant tale. We love you Jimmy…we will miss you brother. @ixneedxmore @jimmywebbnyc

A post shared byDuff ????McKagan (@officialduffmckagan) on

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